Sarke – Bogefod

Sarke

Bogefod

Indie Recordings

March 11th, 2016

Whenever I think of Sarke, I immediately hear those dirty but catchy riffs and the iconic Nocturno Culto’s vocals. Sarke, for me, needs to be like someone who always knows what is the best – straight to the point without irrelevant concealments or delusions. Someone that, when necessary, can punch you in the face without a warning shot. The new Sarke release, Bogefod, arrives 3 years after Aruagint and, with its off-the-wall cover art, is meant to continue the band’s campaign of the dark and evil world of the nocturnal cult.

The artillery of striking riffs attacks you from the very beginning with Taken and Blood of Men quickly reminding you what Sarke is all about. With this energetic and rather intensive start you hear that Bogefod’s sound seems to be dirtier and a little bit more within its roots than the previous album. Nocturno Culto’s legendary vocals are strong and piercing as always and they preclude you from forgetting what you are listening to. You wouldn’t forget anyway as Sarke guys managed to create their own benchmark with 3 previous releases. As you continue to listen to Bogefod you also notice the characteristic change of tempos which adds some drama to the album. As soon as you reach Barrow of Torlov, you’re in for a nice acoustic surprise which perfectly blends with the song’s slow pace and melancholic nuances. That’s not the end of revelations on Bogefod. Dawning features a Norwegian folk singer, Beate Amundsen who lent her operatic voice to create a song which, well, does not fall into the standard repertoire of Sarke. It is although a cool and rather shocking touch to the album. The 4th full-length release of the band provides a bountiful supply of catchy riffs combined with slow and heavy sections which all form a dense and thick composition.

Bogefod is a great continuation of Sarke’s work composed without straying from the path too much. Is it safely played? Well, I will let you decide, but I think that Bogefod is just another showcase of the band’s possibilities and its approach to the dirty tunes. The odour of hell is definitely sensible and with some cool surprises, the album is certainly nothing Sarke should be ashamed of. Let them continue their legacy and grant us with some more albums like that in the near future.

Links:

Sarke
Indie Recordings